Did Ahmadiyya Fail with the African Americans?

Ahmadiyya doctrine has been in the inner cities of the USA circa 1921(See Moslem Sunrise, 1921 edition). They were the only ever missionary society that sold Islam “large-scale” in the USA. At that time, Mahmud Ahmad was the Khalifa and he was very aggressive with his marketing in terms of the global sales network of the Ahmadiyya Movement, i.e. Ahmadiyya dogma.

Mufti Muhammad Sadiq was sent to the USA as a missionary. He was a well respected confidant of MGA and was sure to bag his prey. Upon arrival in the USA, the Mufti quickly began to work with peoples of all colors and developed a group of converts. African-Americans were particularly attracted to the garbled message that the Mufti taught and mistook it for Islam. At the time, African-Americans were being trampled over and were looking for a religion that would preach equality. They began to join Ahmadiyya and by the 1940’s Ahmadis could claim between 5,000—10,000 Ahmadis (See Marabell and Turner).
By the 1950’s most of the African-Americans were on their way out and were particularly upset with the fact that African-Americans were made murrabi and weren’t allowed to hold top leadership positions in the USA jamaat (see Amina McCloud).

More and more Muslims were beginning to emigrate from the Middle East and they were teaching a more orthodox interpretation of Islam. African-Americans began to leave en-masse, they also finally learned that MGA claimed prophethood and in Islamic terms that was heresy (See Amina McCloud).

By the 1970’s, Ahmadiyyat had faded significantly in terms of their advance on the US population. Less and less African-Americans were joining and the children of those that had joined in the 1930’s were disinterested in Ahmadiyya dogma and lifestyle. If you looked recently, the national Khuddam Ijtema and Jalsa’s here in the USA have less than 3% African-Americans.

Nowadays, Ahmadiyyat in the USA is relying on immigration to help fuel this enormous cash cow which is called the USA Ahmadiyya Movement.